Sunday, March 28, 2010

Startup 2010

The 2010 season is starting off wet, very wet. In fact so wet that it's almost the end of March and I'm only just getting started doing any outside work.

After a "not so successful" 2009 I've decided to cut back on what I grow this year and concentrate on just a few basics. This way I'm hoping that the soil will get a much needed rest and it will be a little less work for me when the temperatures get uncomfortably hot.

I've done some rearranging out there for this year..........................


Plots 1 through 4 have now been made into 2 plots. Rotting timbers have been replaced, the plots dug over and mulched. My plan is to leave these two areas empty this year but you never know. Maybe I'll not be able to resist the temptation and start filling them up at a later date.
My plan is to grow only Tomatoes, Bell Peppers and Onions this year but I'm sure that I'll end up with a couple more things besides.

I shall be growing the above in what was plots 5 and 6..................


Plot 5 (above) was in a terrible state but has now been dug over and had lots of home made compost added. This is ready for mulching but I'd run out so it must wait until next week now. I've moved the Swiss Chard plants to the far end but they got so devastated by the Blister Beetles that I'll be surprised if they come back this year.


Plot 6 has had the same treatment and is mulched and ready for use. At the moment I think I'll put 6 Tomato plants in the rear portion of these 2 beds then add the Bell Peppers to the front of one and the onions to the front of the other. As you can see, the Egyptian Onions have survived the winter in both of the above plots. I'll not be growing as many of these this year either.

One of the successes of 2009 was the Mesclun. These tasty greens were great in the salads so..........................

.......I've dug over and composted the old box, thrown a few seeds in and covered it with chicken wire to deter the birds/cats/rabbits.

Around the front of the house the little Rosebush which was sent to me by a friend in Canada has survived the winter..............................

...........and has plenty of new growth. Now my knowledge of growing roses could be written on the back of a postage stamp so it's anyones guess how it will turn out.

As usual, the Daffodils made an appearance just in time to get hit by our last heavy snowfall but they seem to have recovered.


At least we have a little colour around the place to brighten up this soggy weather.

I've started this years tomato seeds and they are now on top of the fridge.



From L to R..... Old Virginia, Black Krim, Sicilian Saucer, Brandywine, Sweet Cherry, Big Red, Giant Beefsteak and Cherokee Purple. As you can see I'm trying out some new varieties this year along with seeds from my own stock.

So, all I need now is a little sunshine and perhaps things can get underway......................

3 comments:

miss m said...

Never did get to see winterizing 2 ... (lol)

Glad you're back, Mick ! Happy Spring ! Your daffs look so pretty ! Great revamp on those beds. I really like that timber. Looks rounded. Is it very expensive ?

Everything is looking great and raring to go. I bet you won't be able to resist planting those bed. I know I couldn't !

Glad the little rosebush is doing well. No doubt in my mind it would make it. No special care needed. Just let it do its thing. And if you don't like it, or it clashes with your decor, just pass it along. :)

LeAnn said...

Mick, please post again. I'd like to know your progress. My parents and grandparents were all from NW Oklahoma (near Cleo Springs) and big gardeners/farmers. Grandpa used to tell stories of OK and crop failures, rattle snakes, chickens, tornados. They moved to Oregon in '53 prior to my birth, but I still feel favorable to gardeners and Oklahomans.

kenranson said...

Hi Mick,
Hello from the land of your birth(and retirement you tell me). Middle of Summer here in Old England, it's cold, damp, dark, but I wouldn't be anywhere else.

Regards,

Ken